FLEXIBLE SLOW COOKER LAMB

FLEXIBLE SLOW COOKER LAMB

This is the recipe from my extremely versatile slow cooker lamb video featured on my facebook page. (https://www.facebook.com/1662831393835438/posts/2047264908725416/)

Ingredients: 
(NOTE: Most of these are approximates. It’s a very forgiving recipe. Put more or less in of whatever you want. Taste as you go. Really relaxed!) 

> 1kg of lamb steaks or cutlets – important they are thick, have a bit of fat and bone – this helps prevent the meat from drying out when cooking and adds immense flavour
> 1kg of lamb offcuts – super cheap meat. Mainly fat and bone with some tender meat. This is the flavour centre of this dish. Offcuts are really cheap too. The offcuts can also be used to make a lamb stock (winter soups etc).
> 2-3+ carrots – roughly chopped to your liking
>1-2 whole onions roughly quartered 
> 1 tin of crushed tomatoes
> 1-2 tbsp tomato paste
> approx 500ml of beef stock (or chicken, or vegetable, really whatever suits your tastes)
> minimum of 150ml red wine – can’t say how much I just pour till I feel content. 
> rosemary 
> peas
> 1 tbsp minced garlic
> salt and pepper to taste
> whatever you want. Really. Want celery? Parsnip? more tomatoes? Go nuts!
> optional – cornflour towards the end to thicken gravy. Useful for pie fillings etc – recommend you reduce a lot more liquid if this is the case. 

Method:

1: Do the gravy first to save time. Cut up all your vegetables ready to go. Add carrot, onion, garlic, tomato paste, stock, crushed tomatoes, rosemary, red wine and any more water if you feel you need it and salt and pepper. Combine well. 

2: Have a pan ready on the highest heat till the pan is smoking hot. Add olive oil and place offcuts in the pan laying away from you to avoid splatter. Sear the outside till you get a golden brown on each surface of the cuts. Place into slow cooker and repeat process with lamb steaks/ cutlets/ whatever you are using. Add lamb chunks to the slow cooker and pour in pan juices.

3: Cover slow cooker and cook on high for roughly 5-6 hours. Check regularly. It’s cooked when the meat is literally falling off the bone and falling apart. Taste frequently and add anything you think it needs (in my family that means LOT’S of salt). 

4: Serve when ready or use this dish in whatever way you like. 

Tips:
1) Depending on how you want to use this dish (pie filling, stew etc) you may need to sift through and remove any remaining strips of fat and bits of bone. The easiest method I have found is wait till it cools and remove by hand. If serving hot however you can use tongs to pull off the meat you want and a ladle to pick out the onion, carrot and gravy you want to pour over. Tackle this step however seems most efficient to you. 
Note: sometimes there are smaller bones that slip through the net. Just be aware of this. 

2) Removing the fat – You may want to even allow the pot to cook and the fat to solidify on top and remove. Otherwise simply skim the fat that settles on top with a spoon. 

3) When making pie filling I have found that after using the cooling method to remove fat and bones you can add this mix back to the stove in a pot to reduce and thicken. Adding a bit of cornflour helps make a thicker gravy that won’t get runny, plus as you stir the meat it should break apart into lovely silky strips as seen in my facebook video. If you’re someone who cares about texture, I personally find it one that can’t be beat!